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Glenside Students Draw Sugar Skulls as Part of Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration

Glenside Students Draw Sugar Skulls as Part of Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration Glenside kindergartners and first graders learned about Mexico during synchronous library class throughout Hispanic Heritage Month. As part of GE Librarian Christine Williames’ month-long curriculum, students read “The Best Mariachi” by J.D. Smith; “Papa Gave Me a Stick” by Janice Levy, “Marco’s Cinco De Mayo” by Lisa Bullard; “Axolotl” by Dawn Oldfield; or “Day of the Dead” by Tony Johnston during asynchronous time.

Students inspired by “Axolotl” and “Day of The Dead” drew sugar skulls, or “calaveras”the iconic symbol for Mexican holiday Day of the Deadfeaturing flowers, animals and other decorations. The skulls are either edible or decorative and created from sugar or clay.

Celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the central and south regions, and by people of Mexican heritage across the globe, the Day of the Dead involves family and friends gathering to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and helping support their spiritual journey.